• PAKISTANIS BREAK HUMAN FLAG RECORD
      More than 24,000 Pakistanis have broken a world record to create the world's largest human flag.
      BBC News, October 29, 2012
    • ANGELINA JOLIE'S CHARITY DONATES TOWARD GIRLS' EDUCATION IN PAKISTAN, AFGHANISTAN
      Angelina Jolie's Education Partnership for Children of Conflict is donating $50,000 in the name of Malala Yousafzai -- the 14-year-old shot by the Taliban -- to Tina Brown's Women in the World Foundation.
      The Hollywood Reporter, October 22, 2012
    • 'THE RELUCTANT FUNDAMENTALIST' OPENS VENICE FILM FESTIVAL
      The cultural clash between east and west after 9/11 is brought sharply into focus in Mira Nair's adaptation of the best-selling novel The Reluctant Fundamentalist, which opened the Venice Film Festival this week.
      BBC News, September 11, 2012
    • PAKISTANI FILM NOMINATED AT NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL
      It’s time for Pakistan to be proud of its film-makers once again! Bodhicitta Film Works’ Seedlings (Lamha) has been nominated in various major categories at the New York City International Film Festival (NYCIFF) that is scheduled to take place this month. The film that was initially chosen to be screened at Times Square in the Big Apple has now bagged nominations for the following: Best Picture, Best Director (Mansoor Mujahid), Best Actress in a Lead Role (Aamina Sheikh), Best Actor in a Lead Role (Mohib Mirza), Best Actor in a supporting Role (Gohar Rasheed) and Best Original Screenplay (Summer Nicks).
      The International Herald Tribune, August 02, 2012
    • OLYMPIC FOOTBALLS: PROUDLY MADE IN SIALKOT
      What lies behind the Adidas logo on these soccer gems is the sweat and blood of hard-working rural women, belonging to the city of Sialkot, Pakistan – an effort concealed in disguise, under a dangerous quilt of consumerism.
      The International Herald Tribune, July 27, 2012
    • IN A TROUBLED COUNTRY, STILL TIME FOR HIGH SOCIETY
      Can celebrity and fashion save Pakistan from its dark image? That’s the proposition of Hello! Pakistan, a glossy new magazine that has opened a new window into the lives of the country’s gilded elite, and rekindled an old debate about their role in a troubled society.
      The New York Times, July 19, 2012
    • PAKISTANI CHEF SPICES UP AMERICAN COOKING SHOW
      “You want to go to university to become a bawarchi (cook)?” – This is the first reaction Fatima Ali, 22, would get when she would tell friends at a highly competitive school in Karachi about her aspirations to become a chef.
      Dawn, July 19, 2012
    • PAKISTAN AND ITS IMAGE PROBLEM
      In meetings last week with the senior General, Prime Minister and the Foreign Minister, they made the case for a new and updated image of Pakistan: one of the largest democracies in the world, with a vibrant and open press, an upcoming demographic dividend of hardworking young people, and a highly educated elite leadership of the country. Islamabad and Lahore, where we visited, were relatively safe and certainly safer than Afghanistan. It was clear to us that Pakistan has an image problem.
      Google +, June 29, 2012
    • BRITON THERE AT PAKISTAN'S BIRTH STAYS AT 94, A LIVING TEXTBOOK
      Geoffrey D. Langlands has had a front-row seat on Pakistan’s many dramas since he arrived, at the country’s chaotic birth, 65 years ago. He has taken tea with princesses, dined with dictators, been kidnapped by tribesmen and scraped through several wars.
      The New York times, June 20, 2012
    • CORY BOOKER TO SALMAN KHAN: YOU'RE AN AMERICAN HERO
      Cory Booker, mayor of Newark, New Jersey and Salman Khan, founder of Kahnacademy.org, talk with Bloomberg's Matt Miller about Khan's educational website and approach to learning across various grade and age levels. They speak on Bloomberg Television's "Bloomberg Rewind." 
      Bloomberg Television, May 08, 2012
    • BABAR PEERZADA DAZZLES IN THE ELEPHANT MAN
      Born in Pakistan, schooled in London and the United States, Babar Peerzada has called Los Angeles home for the past eleven years. One year ago, he dove into developing The Elephant Man.
      The Huffington Post, April 26, 2012
    • VOGUE ITALIA'S PAKISTAN TRAVEL AGENDA
      Take a look at this exciting travel agenda in a destination that guarantees the perfect mix of adventure and luxury.
      Vogue Italia, April 18, 2012
    • TRUCKS AS ART: PAKISTAN'S COLORFUL TRADITION WITH A MIDWESTERN TWIST
      Cargo trucks painted in bright colors, with an extremely intricate level of detail, are a common sight on the the highways of Pakistan. While these fully functional trucks are used only for transporting goods in South Asia, Asheer Akram, a young American artist from Kansas City, Missouri has embarked on the project of building a Pakistani cargo truck with a Midwestern twist in the hope of mixing venerable South Asian traditions with modern American culture.
      The Atlantic, April 18, 2012
    • CHIC PAKISTANI CLOTHING MAKES INROADS IN INDIA
      A ferocious confrontation between India and its archrival, Pakistan, is under way – although not of the kind you perhaps expect. This one pits a host of Pakistani fashion designers, armed with heaps of wafer-thin cotton and lace, against the grimly determined middle-class shoppers of the Indian capital.
      The Globe and Mail, April 17, 2012
    • MODELS HAVE FUN AS PAKISTAN FASHION GROWS UP
      Pakistan's fashion industry is trying to shed its image as entertainment for a gilded elite and instead get recognition for its business success.
      BBC News, April 16, 2012
    • LEARNING TO SING THE LANGUAGE OF LOVE
      Ango-Indian musician Susheela Raman is collaborating with Lahore's qawwali singers. She explains how they learned to make music together
      The Guardian UK, April 12, 2012
    • SIX RULES FOR DINING OUT: PAKISTANI OVER INDIAN
      On average, Pakistani food in the United States is better than Indian food in the United States, and yet a lot of the core dishes do not greatly differ. Northwestern-Indian cuisine is predominant in the U.S., so you find substantial overlap on most Indian and Pakistani menus.
      The Atlantic, April 12, 2012
    • WOMEN WHO MATTER
      They are entrepreneurs, social workers, entertainers, politicians, peacekeepers. Some of these women are household names, others have not garnered the public acclamation their efforts and enterprise merit. Here’s the list for 2012 of Pakistani women who are making a difference.
      Newsweek, April 11, 2012
    • IRAN AND PAKISTAN AT THE OSCARS
      It has been hard to find much art in mainstream American politics this winter or to find much politics in mainstream American art, at least in the filmmaking category.  There were a few fleeting moments of inspiration, though; they came from filmmakers from Pakistan and Iran—two countries that bedevil, befuddle, provoke, and frighten the United States—who slipped in through the Academy’s carefully policed side doors for documentaries and international writers and directors.


      The New Yorker, March 04, 2012
    • HOW TO WIN AN OSCAR
      Decades ago, any mention of Pakistan anywhere in the West was a cause of celebration, no matter how humiliating the reference may be. The snake charmers and yogis of yesteryear have been replaced by computer nerds and gas station attendants, but that’s Hollywood for you: always reducing foreign-looking people to the most reductive character possible. The real problem comes when Pakistanis buy into the same game, actively striving to gain Western recognition or, for those who follow a more mercenary mantra, Western money.
      The International Herald Tribune, March 04, 2012
    • ARE WE WRONG ABOUT PAKISTAN?
      When Peter Oborne first arrived in Pakistan, he expected a 'savage' backwater scarred by terrorism.  Years later, he describes the Pakistan that is barely documented - and that he came to fall in love with
      DNA INDIA, February 29, 2012
    • PAKISTANI FILM FANS PREPARE FOR 'WAAR'
      It claims to not only be the most anticipated film in the history of Pakistan, but to be based on true events. And, for once, the Hollywood-style hyperbole can be excused. The feature-length action thriller called Waar ("to strike" in Urdu) is eagerly awaited, despite being out of tune with the trend for movies packed with singing and dancing.
      The Guardian, February 27, 2012
    • THE SOFTER SIDE OF PESHAWAR
      Foreign reporters coming to Pakistan are often required to undergo survival training to prepare them for kidnappings, explosions and walking through mine fields. They might be better served by courses teaching them to ward off the one question that will rain upon them throughout their stay in the country: why don’t you do more to project the “soft image” of Pakistan?
      The International Herald Tribune, February 27, 2012
    • 'VALLEY OF SAINTS', A KASHMIR LOVE STORY, WINS PRAISE
      A low-budget film set in Kashmir has been picking up plaudits at international film festivals, bringing a different focus to the troubled Himalayan region. “Valley of Saints,” the first feature from U.S. director and screenwriter Musa Syeed, won the World Cinema Audience Award for dramatic feature at the Sundance Film Festival over the weekend.
      The Wall Street Journal, February 06, 2012
    • PAKISTAN'S FIRST OSCAR NOMINEE
      Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy became the first Pakistani filmmaker to earn an Oscar nomination with her film Saving face, which was nominated in the “Documentary, short film” category as the Oscar nominations were released on Tuesday.
      Dawn, January 25, 2012
    • SAMAA STOOPS TO NEW LOWS
      Everyone who was outraged by this show is perfectly right to be outraged. This was a new low in sensationalist television crap. Here were a bunch of television vigilantes serving as the television arm of the Jamia Hafsa crusaders in Islamabad nonsensically claiming to have a "picnic" in a park while harassing poor couples whose only crime seems to be exercising their right to privacy and consensually talking to a member of the opposite sex.
      Cafe Pyala, January 24, 2012
    • PAKISTANI PROGRAMMING PRODIGY PASSES AWAY AT 16
      Arfa Karim Randhawa, the computer programming prodigy who became the world’s youngest Microsoft Certified Professional at 9 years old, has passed away at the age of 16, according to reports out of her native Pakistan this weekend.
      The Today Show, Digital Life, January 16, 2012
    • I'LL BE YOUR MIRROR: WHAT PAKISTAN SEES IN IMRAN KHAN
      Sex, or at least the idea of it, is never far from Imran Khan. It reveals itself in the casual remark of an urbane 20-something friend, a well-educated and usually sensible woman who turned to me and said that she would “do Imran”. “You know,” she further explained, “as a feather in my cap.” It sometimes hangs in the air, almost visible, and as thick as the cloying perfume of the “aunties”.
      The Caravan Journal, January 15, 2012
    • ONLINE LEARNING: PERSONALIZED
      At least 36 schools nationwide are combining teacher-led lessons with computer-based lectures and exercises using a software program based on Salman Khan's popular YouTube lessons.
      The New York Times, December 12, 2011
    • BY WORD OF MOUTH: STUDENT BIRYANI GOES GLOBAL
      Consistent taste and “word of mouth” is what has taken Student Biryani from a small roadside vendor to one of Pakistan’s fastest growing franchise networks. The Karachi-based food outlet – after attracting notable traffic in Dubai – now wants to test North American and European markets; extend its Gulf network through global franchising.
      The International Herald Tribune, November 30, 2011
    • IT'S NOT ABOUT GREG MORTENSON
      Ever since April, when the U.S. newsmagazine show 60 Minutes and writer Jon Krakauer aggressively raised questions about Greg Mortenson and his bestselling book Three Cups of Tea, wherever I go someone inevitably asks me to comment on the situation. I’ve tried to be careful and judicious in my replies because I don’t actually know much, and I’m not directly or officially involved with Greg’s work, although I have been and remain an admirer. But now that it has been more than six months, I feel some things need to be said.
      Ethancasey.com, November 22, 2011
    • MUSLIM CABBIES RESCUE OLDEST BAGEL BAKERY
      The oldest Jewish bialy and bagel shop in New York City is being rescued by two Pakistani Muslim cab drivers - and they plan to keep it kosher.
      The Daily News, November 11, 2011
    • AALOO ANDEY: SATIRE WITH A BITE IN PAKISTAN
      Potato and egg curry - the scourge of every Pakistani school lunch box - is the inspiration for one of the most biting and daring satires the country has seen in years. But is it too big a risk?
      BBC News, November 04, 2011
    • PAKISTANI DESIGNS HIT CATWALK AS INDUSTRY GROWS
      Last week, Karachi hosted Pakistan's fourth fashion week in three years, with more than 50 models taking part in the four-day event. Despite security concerns in the past, fashion shows are growing in popularity in Pakistan and attracting international buyers.
      BBC News, October 20, 2011
    • REVOLUTION, AMPLIFIED
      Salman Ahmad, founder of rock band Junoon, discusses 20 years of making music and breaking boundaries.
      India Abroad, October 12, 2011
    • AN INTERVIEW WITH 'MORNING EDITION'S' STEVE INSKEEP
      The NPR 'Morning Edition' host talks about Pakistan, the subject of his new book, and why some people might find him annoying.
      The Daily Beast, October 12, 2011
    • THE PRICE OF ORANGES: REFLECTIONS ON AN ENCOUNTER WITH BENAZIR BHUTTO
      Not much happened in Islamabad in 1998. Not much happened in Pakistan, in fact—or at least not much that troubled editors, viewers, readers, or policy makers in Europe or the United States.  Most media organizations covered Pakistan from India. It was not a big story. The rediscovery of Pakistan and Afghanistan would come, with breathless haste, on September 12, 2001.
      Guernica, October 06, 2011
    • ZOE VICCAJI: A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING
      Zoe Viccaji is among those few artists who are a world in themselves – a world comprised of creativity, wonder and possibilities. From the minute I stepped into her house, she managed to surprise me with her humble, down-to-earth personality.
      Newsline, September 11, 2011
    • ONE STUDENT'S JOURNEY FROM SMALL-TOWN BALOCHISTAN TO HARVARD
      Located on the outskirts of Quetta, is the barren valley of Mariabad where the Hazara lead slow-paced lives. These tribal people, living in narrow brick huts speckled along the rugged hillside, typically sell loose cloth, sweaters or tea for their livelihood.
      The International Herald Tribune, September 10, 2011
    • UMAR SAIF IN TOP TECH INNOVATORS UNDER 35
      Umar Saif of Lahore, Pakistan developed ­BitMate. The software lets different users in the same area pool the bandwidth of their connections to reduce download times, typically by half. Released in February, the software has already been downloaded more than 30,000 times by people in 173 countries.
      Technology Review, September 01, 2011
    • PAKISTANI BOY SETS WORLD RECORD, SCORES 28 A'S IN O LEVELS
      A Pakistani student from Beaconhouse has set a new world record by achieving 28 A’s in the University of Cambridge’s O-level examinations.
      The International Herald Tribune, September 01, 2011
    • PAKISTAN CREATES NEW ANTHEM RECORD
      Enthusiasts gathered in Karachi to create a new record for the most number of people singing a national anthem simultaneously – and they succeeded.
      The International Herald Tribune, August 18, 2011
    • A BAN LIFTED, KING OF FRUIT MAKES DEBUT
      A year after the U.S. lifted a ban on Pakistani mangoes, the first commercial shipment landed in New York over the weekend.Considered among their somewhat biased fans to be the world's tastiest mango, the fruits are selling for $80 to $100 for a box of six after the sole U.S. importer had to get them from Lahore to Chicago, over to Iowa for required irradiation and, finally, to New York.
      The Wall Street Journal, August 18, 2011
    • GOOD WILL TO ALL, WITH A SIDE OF SOFT-SERVE
      The Dairy Queen is a neon beacon of comfort in Kenhorst, Pa., with cold chocolaty treats for hot summer days and scores and scores of posted handwritten thank-you notes to its owner, Hamid Chaudhry.
      The New York Times, August 18, 2011
    • PAKISTAN IT FIRM TOPS WORLD RANKING WITH BLACKBERRY GAME
      The Lahore-based Pepper.pk and Five Rivers Technologies made it to the number one spot across all categories on BlackBerry’s AppWorld on August 3 with their game Ninja Fruit Bash, developed for BlackBerry smartphones.
      The International Herald Tribune, August 05, 2011
    • 13 PAKISTANIS YOU WILL MEET IN US COLLEGES
      I’m not sure if the same kinds of Pakistani students are at every campus, but these are the ones I’ve come across on a few campuses across the States.
      The International Herald Tribune, August 05, 2011
    • KARACHI FASHION WEEK: MODEL AND CHOREOGRAPHERS SEARCH BEGINS
      The Third Karachi Fashion Week model hunt kicks off.  See some of the contenders.
      The International Herald Tribune, July 27, 2011
    • HAVE YOU BEEN GETTING YOUR FILL OF COKE STUDIO
      The last Coke Studio episode was satisfying enough. But YouTube previews suggested that the coming instalment would be quite strong at the very least. In its fourth episode, Coke Studio performed its usual balancing act of simple pleasures and ambitious experiments, and did a fine job.
      Newsline, July 27, 2011
    • PAKISTAN ORCHESTRA REINVENTS JAZZ CLASSICS
      A new orchestra in the Pakistani city of Lahore is causing some excitement in the world of jazz - and turning around their own fortunes at the same time.
      BBC News, July 21, 2011
    • SOUTH ASIANS IN HOLLYWOOD: FROM FRINGE TO MAINSTREAM
      ISLAMABAD: It seems that brown is the new black, and there’s no going back! The fast-growing South Asian-American demographic has led to some major changes in Hollywood studios.
      The International Herald Tribune, July 06, 2011
    • COKE STUDIO: MUSICAL VOYAGE THROUGH VARIOUS LANGUAGES
      KARACHI: The second-last episode of “Coke Studio 4” took its viewers through a musical excursion across Pakistani culture.
      The International Herald Tribune, July 04, 2011
    • OSCAR WINNING VISUAL EFFECTS ARTIST MAKES KARACHI LOOK SO GOOD
      The world can also thank visual effects specialist Mir Zafar Ali for bringing the villain ‘Venom’ to life in Spider-Man III. Now, he’s basking in the aftermath of another success, X-Men: First Class – the debuted at No. 1 in the box office in its opening weekend.
      The International Herald Tribune, June 14, 2011
    • SESAME STREET COMES TO PAKISTAN
      US government aid agency sponsors $20m Pakistani remake of the American kids' TV show.

      The Guardian (London), April 07, 2011
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