• ANGELINA JOLIE'S CHARITY DONATES TOWARD GIRLS' EDUCATION IN PAKISTAN, AFGHANISTAN
      Angelina Jolie's Education Partnership for Children of Conflict is donating $50,000 in the name of Malala Yousafzai -- the 14-year-old shot by the Taliban -- to Tina Brown's Women in the World Foundation.
      The Hollywood Reporter, October 22, 2012
    • MALALA YOUSUFZAI: WOMEN'S RIGHTS AND THE NARRATIVES OF THE RULING ELITES
      You’d think that if it weren’t for the Taliban shooting at them, millions of girls in Pakistan would be sitting in school. These kinds of stories are convenient for Pakistan’s entrenched ruling classes, but they have very little to do with the deeper truth. The reality isn’t so complex, but it has to be spelled out a bit.
      The Platform, October 22, 2012
    • FUNDRAISING FOR MALALA FUND KICKS OFF AT LUMS
      The LUMS community expressed its protest at the horrific attack on 14-year-old education activist, Malala Yousufzai through a peace vigil at the Central Courtyard of the LUMS campus. Students, staff and faculty gathered to pay tribute to the bravery and dedication shown by MalalaYousufzai and also prayed for her quick recovery.
      LUMS.org, October 16, 2012
    • WE ARE ALL MALALA YOUSAFZAI
      Three days ago, a young Pakistani girl from Swat was shot in the head, point-blank, by a Taliban gunman. Miraculously, she is still alive - a courageous young woman who will not be silenced. Malala Yusufzai, the 14 year-old champion of a woman's right to self-expression, lies in critical condition in a hospital in Rawalpindi. Her attackers claim to be enacting the will of God. The Pakistani public, and Muslims around the world, vehemently disagree.
      The Huffington Post, October 16, 2012
    • NEW STANFORD/NYU STUDY ON CIVILIAN TERROR LINK TO OBAMA'S DRONES
      New research shows the terrorizing impact of drones in Pakistan, false statements from US officials, and how it increases the terror threat
      The Guardian, September 26, 2012
    • TWO PAKISTANI WOMEN FEATURE ON 'FOREIGN POLICY LEADERS' LIST
      Two Pakistani women have been featured on “Top 99 under 33 Foreign Policy Leaders,” list compiled by the The Diplomatic Courier (TDC).
      The International Herald Tribune, September 11, 2012
    • PAKISTANI BORN MAYOR REPAIRS, AND WINDS, TEXANS' HEARTS
      This charming, droopy city needed new fire trucks not long ago, but, like many American municipalities today, couldn’t necessarily afford them. The mayor, a small-government Republican, dithered: to buy or not to buy? He turned to the natural choice for advice on running a Texan city: Pervez Musharraf, the exiled ex-president of Pakistan.
      The New York Times, August 02, 2012
    • DREAM FULFILLED AS COLLEGE GATES OPEN FOR GUARD'S DAUGHTER
      The burly hands of Akhtar clutched the metal bar of the gate with amazing strength. The darkened edges of skin around his eyes told tales of the many nights he had spent staying awake, patrolling this very gate. Pride radiates his sun-burnt face as he says, “Finally there was a letter from Lums which said that my daughter had been selected for the National Outreach Programme (NOP).”
      The International Herald Tribune, July 27, 2012
    • FATIMA JINNAH: CANDID MEMORIES
      A friend emailed me the other day: “Hardly any body ever talks about [Fatima Jinnah] these days – I wonder how many even know her today?” He  also alerted me to a very interesting review of a new book on Fatima Jinnah (Memories of Fatima Jinnah by Sorayya Khurshid, translated into English by the much-talended Khalid Hasan, 2008) which includes her candid memories of many of the key personalities from Pakistan’s history – from Liaquat Ali Khan to Ayub Khan.
      Pakistaniat.com, July 11, 2012
    • POLIO ERADICATION HELD HOSTAGE IN PAKISTAN
      There is something to the argument that drone strikes do more damage than polio. North Waziristan suffered from only 14 new polio cases last year, even as U.S. drone strikes killed over 250 of its residents, many of them armed militants allied with Bahadur. Of course, that these same militants are in fact largely responsible for both the mayhem and the public health crisis in Waziristan likely doesn't enter into Bahadur's calculations.
      Foreign Policy, July 11, 2012
    • PAKISTAN AND ITS IMAGE PROBLEM
      In meetings last week with the senior General, Prime Minister and the Foreign Minister, they made the case for a new and updated image of Pakistan: one of the largest democracies in the world, with a vibrant and open press, an upcoming demographic dividend of hardworking young people, and a highly educated elite leadership of the country. Islamabad and Lahore, where we visited, were relatively safe and certainly safer than Afghanistan. It was clear to us that Pakistan has an image problem.
      Google +, June 29, 2012
    • IMRAN KHAN: NEXT MAN IN?
      Once an international cricket star, Pakistan's Imran Khan is now playing for a greater prize - to be his country's next prime minister. But can he upset the political status quo?
      Al Jazeera, June 04, 2012
    • CHANGING THE NARRATIVE
      PAKISTAN is seething with anti-Americanism. This public sentiment is constraining the state’s ability to find sensible options to work out the US-Pakistan relationship.
      Dawn, May 30, 2012
    • NEW HOMES OFFER NEW LIVES FOR PAKISTAN FLOOD VICTIMS
      he UN refugee agency has joined local authorities in handing over ownership of 400 new one-room homes to a fishing community in Pakistan left homeless by devastating floods in 2010.
      UNHCR, May 25, 2012
    • MAKE LOLLY NOT WAR
      India gears up for a welcome expansion in trade with Pakistan: The calm is about to end. The chief at the India-Pakistan border says the warehouses, vehicle-inspection pits and staff with high-tech scanners are poised to handle as many as 1,000 lorries a day—several times more than before. He pledges to “work round the clock” to let bilateral trade between South Asia’s two largest economies bloom like never before.
      The Economist, May 13, 2012
    • RED CROSS MAKES PAINFUL DECISION IN PAKISTAN
      The International Committee of the Red Cross has decided to suspend operations in two cities in Pakistan. This comes after the humanitarian organization discontinued work in Balochistan province, following the murder of a British staff member.
      Devex.com, May 13, 2012
    • PAKISTAN: CAN CIVIL SOCIETY CREATE A STABLE, PROSPEROUS FUTURE?
      The mere mention of Pakistan conjures up headlines about terrorist attacks, militant groups and airstrikes. But beneath the turmoil lies a country with enormous assets, from vast natural resources to an enviable location that should facilitate trade with both India and China. Y
      Milken Institute, May 08, 2012
    • PAKISTAN'S UNTOLD EXONOMIC STORY
      For more than a decade, Pakistan has partnered with the United States to combat the extremism and militancy that threatens the stability of our region and the world. This fight has taken an enormous human toll on our people, with over 37,000 civilians killed and more than 5,000 police and soldiers lost. In addition to the enormous human tragedy, this struggle has directly and negatively impacted our economy and the development of our nation.
      The Wall Street Journal, April 26, 2012
    • CHIC PAKISTANI CLOTHING MAKES INROADS IN INDIA
      A ferocious confrontation between India and its archrival, Pakistan, is under way – although not of the kind you perhaps expect. This one pits a host of Pakistani fashion designers, armed with heaps of wafer-thin cotton and lace, against the grimly determined middle-class shoppers of the Indian capital.
      The Globe and Mail, April 17, 2012
    • USAID TO CUT DOWN PROJECTS IN PAKISTAN
      A few years back, the United States launched a five-year, $7.5 billion civilian aid program in Pakistan. Supporters of the initiative hoped it would improve the Pakistanis’ perception of America and pull them away from the allure of terrorist groups such as the Taliban and al-Qaida. The program failed to gain traction. Instead, relations between the two countries soured. The general sentiment in Pakistan is that civilian aid has done “little” to help the average citizen,The Associated Press reports.
      International Development, April 14, 2012
    • ECHOING GREEN FINALISTS: THREE FROM PAKISTAN
      Today we announce thirty-eight have been selected as Finalists—approximately one percent—of the original pool. Read about their grand aspirations, innovative solutions, passion for their work, and of course, their Moments of Obligation—the experiences that led the Finalists to confront the biggest problems in the world with their bold solutions for social change. Be prepared to feel hopeful too!
      Echoing Green, April 13, 2012
    • A KENNEDY FOR PAKISTAN?
      Pakistan is almost unrecognizable from the country I knew a decade ago. Young Pakistanis in particular—and two-thirds of the population are thirty or younger—are increasingly disillusioned by the political establishment. Many seem to want a sharp rupture with the status quo: an end to what they regard as the entrenched culture of incompetence and kleptocracy in Islamabad that has left them with little opportunity and dangerous insecurity.
      The New York Review of Books, April 09, 2012
    • THE BRITISH PAKISTANI DIASPORA: THE CORE OF SMART POWER
      This week I caught up with Suniya Qureshi, the Executive Director of the British Pakistan Foundation to talk matters through. I have known Suniya for a while now, and as with many women, she has quiet, gentle knowledge – the diversity of which bowls me over every time I speak to her.
      Dawn, March 09, 2012
    • PAKISTAN FLOODS CRISIS FAR FROM OVER
      Six months after floods devastated large parts of southern Pakistan, the emergency is "far from over", with at least 2.5 million people lacking essentials such as clean water, enough food and durable shelter, says a report from a coalition of Pakistani and international aid agencies.
      ALERT NET, February 29, 2012
    • DR. RIZWAN NASEER: SAVING LIVES AND CHANGING MINDS IN PAKISTAN
      Dr. Rizwan Naseer, 44, is a true hero of Pakistan. Frustrated with how trauma patients were treated and the lack of emergency care, he decided to change things. Up to date his team’s efforts have saved more than 1.2 million lives. We got a chance to speak to him.
      Elan Magazine, February 21, 2012
    • PERILOUS JOURNEY
      For many in Pakistan,their country, they say, has so much going for it, yet all the foreign press writes about is the dark side: warfare, terrorism, corruption and natural disasters.
      The Economist, February 10, 2012
    • HISTORIC GAIN FOR WOMEN IN PAKISTAN AS WOMEN'S COMMISSION GAINS AUTONOMOUS STATUS
      On 2 February 2012, the Pakistan Senate unanimously approved the “National Commission on the Status of Women Bill 2012″ to protect women’s rights against every kind of discrimination. The new bill replaces the National Commission on the Status of Women Ordinance from 2000 and strengthens the Commission by giving it financial and administrative autonomy through an independent Secretariat.
      UN Women, February 09, 2012
    • DOOM PROPHETS, ALAS, CONFOUNDED AGAIN
      The Zardari dispensation has not collapsed; the PPP has not grovelled, an apology of any sort the last thing on its mind; and the doom pundits, predicting demise and downfall these past three years, have some more frustration to hang on to and live with.
      The News, Pakistan, January 24, 2012
    • IS IMRAN KHAN THE LEADER PAKISTAN NEEDS?
      I’m not Pakistani, and for me to make pronouncements or pass judgment on Pakistani domestic politics would be presumptuous. But several Pakistani friends have asked me to write about Imran Khan. I do so now, albeit hesitantly, because what he represents is an important subject at this pregnant historical moment.
      Dawn.com, January 24, 2012
    • PAKISTAN HIGH COURT WIDENS ROLE, STIRRING FEARS FOR STABILITY
      Once they were heroes, cloaked justices at the vanguard of a powerful revolt against military rule in Pakistan, buoyed by pugnacious lawyers and an adoring public. But now Pakistan’s Supreme Court is waging a campaign of judicial activism that has pitted it against an elected civilian government, in a legal fight that many Pakistanis fear could damage their fragile democracy and open the door to a fresh military intervention.
      The New York Times, January 24, 2012
    • SAMAA STOOPS TO NEW LOWS
      Everyone who was outraged by this show is perfectly right to be outraged. This was a new low in sensationalist television crap. Here were a bunch of television vigilantes serving as the television arm of the Jamia Hafsa crusaders in Islamabad nonsensically claiming to have a "picnic" in a park while harassing poor couples whose only crime seems to be exercising their right to privacy and consensually talking to a member of the opposite sex.
      Cafe Pyala, January 24, 2012
    • HOW PAKISTAN HELPS THE U.S. DRONE CAMPAIGN
      The death of a senior al Qaeda leader in a U.S. drone strike in Pakistan's tribal badlands, the first strike in almost two months, signalled that the U.S.-Pakistan intelligence partnership is still in operation despite political tensions.
      Reuters, January 24, 2012
    • COPING WITH STRUCTURAL IMBALANCES
      This article contends that we will have to learn to live with budget deficits of 6 percent plus of GDP, accept that the economy will grow slowly, that our rate of inflation will be persistently higher than our competitors and that the rupee will continue to be under pressure.
      The News, Pakistan, January 22, 2012
    • PAKISTAN, A MALLEABLE HISTORY
      Last month, while other pyalas scuttled off to the Pakistan Tehrik-e-Insaf's (PTI’s) Karachi jalsa with visions of free potty training seats in their heads, I stayed at home with a copy of Imran Khan’s Pakistan, A Personal History. I read it with the intention of reviewing it here immediately but, like certain Bufo toads that can, at will, secrete a noxious hallucinogenic substance that acts as a deterrent to predators, the book did not encourage further handling.
      Cafe Pyala, January 15, 2012
    • EMBATTLED ZARDARI BACK IN PAKISTAN AFTER DUBAI TRIP
      Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari has returned home after taking a trip to Dubai, officials say. His departure on Thursday came amid a deepening political crisis with the military.
      BBC News, January 15, 2012
    • I'LL BE YOUR MIRROR: WHAT PAKISTAN SEES IN IMRAN KHAN
      Sex, or at least the idea of it, is never far from Imran Khan. It reveals itself in the casual remark of an urbane 20-something friend, a well-educated and usually sensible woman who turned to me and said that she would “do Imran”. “You know,” she further explained, “as a feather in my cap.” It sometimes hangs in the air, almost visible, and as thick as the cloying perfume of the “aunties”.
      The Caravan Journal, January 15, 2012
    • THE PAKISTANIS HAVE A POINT
      Talk to Pakistani politicians, scholars, generals, businessmen, spies and journalists — as I did in October — and before long, you are beyond the realm of politics and diplomacy and into the realm of hurt feelings. Words like “ditch” and “jilt” and “betray” recur. With Americans, they complain, it’s never a commitment, it’s always a transaction. This theme is played to the hilt, for effect, but it is also heartfelt.
      The New York Times, December 18, 2011
    • PAKISTANIS TAKING TO THE STREETS
      It’s an unusual sight for a Sunday morning: a dozen Karachiites armed with brooms, rakes, sand and rubble crouch along a road on which none of them live or work in order to mend a large, sewage-filled pothole. They are members of the Greener Karachi Trust, a volunteer group committed to showing its fellow Karachi dwellers that they needn’t wait for the government to repair the city’s crumbling infrastructure.  These small gestures may not transform Pakistan’s cities in the short term, but they do inspire citizens to convert resignation into activism.
      The New York Times, December 18, 2011
    • PAKISTAN: BOMBS, SPIES AND WILD PARTIES
      People often ask the most basic question about Pakistan: will it survive? The question has been going round for decades; the naysayers inevitably silenced. Is the current situation any more precarious? The country has deep stores of resilience, but is more vulnerable to external shocks than ever before. One thing, however, is clear: inshallah may have worked until now, but it is no longer enough.
      The Guardian UK, December 18, 2011
    • MANSOOR IJAZ, THE MAN TO STIRRED UP PAKISTAN'S 'MEMOGATE'
      It was the perfect afternoon to be on his yacht. Mansoor Ijaz, a global hedge fund manager with a home-office view of the French Riviera, says he planned to sail the Mediterranean on that sunny day in early May — but then his BlackBerry beeped.
      The Washngton Post, December 12, 2011
    • WATTS TO WATER: BROTHERS IN RURAL PAKISTAN PROVIDING GREEN ENERGY
      Three brothers working in Pakistan’s remote Chitral communities are helping provide green electricity for 45,000 homes.
      The Green Prophet, November 22, 2011
    • PAKISTAN'S APPLE FRUIT WASTED DUE TO LACK OF INFRASTRUCTURE
      Pakistan has insufficient infrastructure and much of it doesn't make it to
      market, despite being a competitive (if not superior) product to
      apples from other markets.
      Freshplaza.com, November 22, 2011
    • IT'S NOT ABOUT GREG MORTENSON
      Ever since April, when the U.S. newsmagazine show 60 Minutes and writer Jon Krakauer aggressively raised questions about Greg Mortenson and his bestselling book Three Cups of Tea, wherever I go someone inevitably asks me to comment on the situation. I’ve tried to be careful and judicious in my replies because I don’t actually know much, and I’m not directly or officially involved with Greg’s work, although I have been and remain an admirer. But now that it has been more than six months, I feel some things need to be said.
      Ethancasey.com, November 22, 2011
    • PAKISTAN'S TRUE LIVING HERO
      His name is Abdul Sattar Edhi. He is a legend in Pakistan, where he has been hailed as a Mahatma Gandhi and Father Teresa — and denounced as an infidel, communist and madman.
      The Washington Post, November 22, 2011
    • WHAT PAKISTANI AMERICANS CAN DO TO HELP
      I want to challenge the Pakistani-American community to do more. If, by doing so, I provoke some spirited debate and even annoy some people, so much the better.
      Dawn, November 11, 2011
    • SHARIA LAW: 5 THINGS EVERY NON-MUSLIM SHOULD KNOW
      Do Muslims really want to rule America with Sharia Law?  Most definitely not.  Learn why and other important facts in this enlightening piece by Qasim Rashid.
      The Huffington Post, November 11, 2011
    • IMRAN KHAN: THE MYTH AND THE REALITY
      WHEN Imran Khan launched the Pakistan Tehrik-i-Insaf in 1996, then Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto rhetorically asked, “Can Imran win 51 per cent seats in parliament to form a government?” A decade and a half later, the same question haunts Mr Khan even when he has recently gathered together the largest public assembly of his entire political life.
      Dawn, November 11, 2011
    • THE CHANGING FACE OF THE TALIBAN
      In my trip from Kandahar to Kabul in 2001, I truly came to understand the tragedy that was Afghanistan and the circumstances that gave rise to the group whose name has now become shorthand for all that is myopic, literalist and extremist for most on the one hand, and for a brave indigenous resistance to a foreign occupation to some on the other.
      Dawn, November 11, 2011
    • THE PRINCE WHO WOULD BE KING
      Imran Khan has taken fifteen years to capture the imagination of the young and alienated as demonstrated in the huge public rally by the PTI in Lahore last Sunday. Two new factors are responsible for the sudden spotlight on Imran.
      The Friday Times, November 11, 2011
    • FOR OUR ALLIES, DEATH FROM ABOVE
      My mistake had been to see the drone war in Waziristan in terms of abstract legal theory — as a blatantly illegal invasion of Pakistan’s sovereignty, akin to President Richard M. Nixon’s bombing of Cambodia in 1970.  But now, the issue has suddenly become very real and personal.
      The New York Times, November 11, 2011
    • PARVEEN SAEED'S QUEST TO FEED THE POOR IN KARACHI
      When Karachi resident Parveen Saeed read the story of a local woman who killed her two children because she could not afford to feed them, she decided something had to be done.
      BBC News, November 04, 2011
    • AALOO ANDEY: SATIRE WITH A BITE IN PAKISTAN
      Potato and egg curry - the scourge of every Pakistani school lunch box - is the inspiration for one of the most biting and daring satires the country has seen in years. But is it too big a risk?
      BBC News, November 04, 2011
    • SUICIDAL DESPAIR OF PAKISTANI FATHER
      A young Pakistani man set himself on fire outside parliament in Islamabad in protest at his failure to find a job, and inability to feed his family. Human rights workers in Pakistan say suicides stemming from poverty are on the increase. But these deaths often pass unnoticed, as Orla Guerin reports.
      BBC News, November 04, 2011
    • ARE THE STARS FINALLY SMILING ON IMRAN KHAN?
      It can be seen at dinner conversations, where our liberal elite are no longer taking every opportunity to ridicule his minor inconsistencies and misdemeanours or in how his party workers are slowly becoming more recognizable on television. It is through this growing momentum that Imran Khan’s prospects are rapidly changing.
      The International Herald Tribune, November 04, 2011
    • VICTORY FOR NUSRAT
      Nusrat Bhutto’s struggle and the struggle for democracy run parallel — against ruthless military dictators and martial laws, facing treachery, wounds, injuries, tortures and defeats and finally emerging victorious
      The News, Pakistan, November 04, 2011
    • US DRONE STRIKES FAIL TO MOBILISE MASSES
      Campaigners condemn US drone strikes in Pakistan as extra-judicial assassinations that kill hundreds of civilians, but popular protests against them are conspicuous by their rarity.
      Dawn, November 04, 2011
    • IN PAKISTAN, A MILITANT DEAL SOURS
      The deal saw one of Pakistan’s most feared militants walk from jail apparently in exchange for his commitment to nonviolence, help in reining in other fighters and possibly delivering the votes of his followers.
      Dawn, November 04, 2011
    • PAKISTAN AND INDIA IN HISTORIC TRADE PUSH
      India and Pakistan are preparing for the biggest liberalisation in bilateral trade since partition more than six decades ago, reviving commercial ties that have been strangled ever since the end of British rule in 1947.
      CNN, October 20, 2011
    • LIGHTS OUT
      ALTHOUGH Pakistan makes international news for terrorist attacks, anti-American demonstrations and its alleged support for insurgents in Afghanistan, it is the basic inability to switch on a light that is pushing this volatile country closer to the edge.
      The Economist, October 12, 2011
    • TEEN ATHLETE FLED TALIBAN TO PURSUE DREAMS
      Pakay, 18, is Pakistan's No. 1-ranked women's squash player. But what makes her story remarkable is that she hails from the country's tribal region of South Waziristan.
      CNN, October 12, 2011
    • PAKISTAN: AN OMINOUS SILENCE IN THE MEDIA
      Once again, Pakistan’s monsoon flooding is causing devastation for millions. But in the face of this massive catastrophe, there has been an ominous silence in the media when it comes to conveying to the rest of the world the severity of what is happening to the people of Pakistan.
      The Independent, October 12, 2011
    • FLOODS IN PAKISTAN DAMAGE 3.7% OF TOTAL CROP AREA
      Floods in Pakistan have damaged at least 880,000 hectares of standing crops, including rice, maize, cotton, sugar cane, fruit orchards and vegetables, which represent about 3.7 per cent of total national crop area, the United Nations’ food agency said on Tuesday, citing preliminary official estimates.
      The International Herald Tribune, October 12, 2011
    • PAKISTAN: LOCALLY UNDERRATED, GLOBALLY MISUNDERSTOOD
      A question I have heard in various forms by countless people. After six months of living in Pakistan, I imagined the questions and shock would have settled by now. However, I am still continuously asked why I am here. On many occasions, Pakistanis have been just as shocked as anyone else as to why a non-Pakistani would ever want to stay in such a country.
      The International Herald Tribune, October 12, 2011
    • THE POLITICS OF PUNJAB'S BELLY
      Couple of things worth saying about Cyril Almeida's piece on Imran Khan but, before I begin, let me just recap the situation for the 5 major parties that have a say in how future elections would pan out in the province.
      Recycled Thought, October 12, 2011
    • AS FLOODWATERS RECEDE URGENT HUMANITARIAN NEEDS REMAIN
      As UNHCR continues to distribute tents and other emergency relief supplies to thousands of flood victims in southern Pakistan, many of the displaced are still living in precarious conditions, untouched by aid efforts.
      UNHCR, October 12, 2011
    • SHARES SURGE AFTER KEY RATE SLASHED
      Pakistan stocks jumped 2.5 percent on Oct. 10 as investors were boosted by the central bank’s surprise decision to slash interest rates at the weekend‚ dealers said.
      Newsweek Pakistan, October 12, 2011
    • 100 WOMEN WHO SHAKE PAKISTAN
      They make up almost half of Pakistan's population of 180 million, but are rarely given the space and coverage they deserve. From Fatima Jinnah to Rana Liaquat Ali Khan to Benazir Bhutto, Pakistan has produced some very remarkable women.
      Newsweek Pakistan, October 12, 2011
    • GROWING HOPE FOR TRADE TIES BETWEEN INDIA AND PAKISTAN
      Business leaders from India and Pakistan say there's new optimism about the efforts their governments are making to improve trade ties. But critics warn that overcoming decades of mistrust may not be that easy.
      BBC News, October 06, 2011
    • THE PRICE OF ORANGES: REFLECTIONS ON AN ENCOUNTER WITH BENAZIR BHUTTO
      Not much happened in Islamabad in 1998. Not much happened in Pakistan, in fact—or at least not much that troubled editors, viewers, readers, or policy makers in Europe or the United States.  Most media organizations covered Pakistan from India. It was not a big story. The rediscovery of Pakistan and Afghanistan would come, with breathless haste, on September 12, 2001.
      Guernica, October 06, 2011
    • THE CRUX OF THE CRISIS
      Diplomatic efforts have helped in the past week to defuse the latest crisis to rock Pakistan-US relations. Although the immediate tensions have dissipated these developments have reaffirmed the tenuous quality of the relationship.
      The News, Pakistan, October 06, 2011
    • PAKISTAN TERROR NO BAR AS UNILEVER CONVERGES WITH NESTLE
      Unilever and Nestle SA (NESN) are defying turmoil in Pakistan, where terror attacks have killed at least 35,000 people since 2006, to sell more soap, beauty products and milk to farmers enriched by higher cotton and wheat prices.
      Bloomberg, October 06, 2011
    • UNHCR AND PAKISTAN GOV'T LAUNCH SURVEY ON AFGHAN REFUGEES
      An ambitious project to survey the world's largest refugee population has been launched by UNHCR and the government of Pakistan.
      UNHCR, September 19, 2011
    • JAPAN PROVIDES 35MM YEN IN RELIEF
      Japan on Tuesday announced provison of emergency assistance of 35 million Yen - approximately 450,000 US dollars, to help Pakistan cope with the recent torrential rains.
      THE ASSOCIATED PRESS OF PAKISTAN, September 19, 2011
    • HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS IN PAKISTAN
      Muhammad Azhar Ali, factory manager for National Foods in Karachi, Pakistan, has a set work routine. At dawn he calls his production managers, who live in different parts of this sprawling city of 18 million on the Arabian Sea, to find out whether outbreaks of violence have rendered any areas dangerous.
      Bloomberg Business Week, September 19, 2011
    • POWER GRID
      In Pakistan, in the nineteen-sixties and seventies, I remember seeing high-tension electric pylons that had affixed to them a shield similar to something Captain America might carry. These pylons and the accompanying power grid were American gifts, built by American engineers, proof of the two countries’ solidarity.
      The New Yorker, September 15, 2011
    • PAKISTAN FLOODS DISPLACE MILLIONS
      Pakistan has appealed to the UN for international humanitarian aid for millions of flood victims in the south of the country. At least 130 people have been killed as mud houses in remote rural areas collapsed in the heavy rain.
      BBC News, September 15, 2011
    • MONEY MARKET FUNDS WITNESS HIGH GROWTH IN PAKISTAN
      During the past seven months (Jan-July), the money market category of funds appreciated by 81 per cent from Rs32 billion in December 2010.
      All Voices, September 11, 2011
    • AYESHA JALAL ON PAKISTAN'S 'REVENGE OF THE '40S, THEN THE '80S'
      It takes a historian of Ayesha Jalal's power to crystallize an awkward truth: that the agony of Pakistan today is inseparable from the tragedy of Pakistan's birth in 1947. Still more bluntly, that Pakistan as we know it is not at all the country that its sainted founder, Mohammad Ali Jinnah, had in mind. As she puts it in conversation, "Complete partition was the last thing he wanted…"
      The Asia Society online, September 11, 2011
    • YES, VIRGINIA, THERE REALLY IS SOME GOOD NEWS IN PAKISTAN
      I recently traveled to Pakistan to report on a few stories, including a profile of Millat Tractors, below.
      Forbes, September 10, 2011
    • SCHOOLS IN SINDH TO TEACH CHINESE
      The government of the Pakistani province of Sindh has announced plans to make Chinese compulsory in schools from 2013.
      BBC News, September 06, 2011
    • MOHSIN HAMID ON A 'PAKISTAN-LIKE' TREND IN AMERICA
      Mohsin Hamid wrote the hair-raising novel The Reluctant Fundamentalist that will soon be a major motion picture directed by Mira Nair of “Monsoon Wedding” fame.  Read his most recent thoughts on how America is becoming more and more like Pakistan.
      Radio Open Source, September 06, 2011
    • DROWNING TODAY, PARCHED TOMORROW
      HARD as it may be to believe when you see the images of the monsoon floods that are now devastating Pakistan, the country is actually on the verge of a critical shortage of fresh water. And water scarcity is not only a worry for Pakistan’s population — it is a threat to America’s national security as well.
      The New York Times, September 01, 2011
    • ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION HONORS SANIA NISHTAR OF HEARTFILE
      The Innovation Forum convenes some of the most creative and inventive minds from the worlds of business, government, the non-profit sector and journalism to bring innovation to bear on urgent challenges facing poor and vulnerable people around the world.
      , September 01, 2011
    • PAKISTAN'S ONLY TRUE LIVING HERO
      The leftist tinge of his speech suggested that Edhi was more complex than a saintly do-gooder. He was a self-appointed conscience of the nation, seeking to shock the comfortable and galvanize the afflicted. And he got away with it, year after year, because he lived what he preached.
      The Washinton Post, September 01, 2011
    • PAKISTANI PILOT REACHES OUT TO DAUGHTER OF INDIAN MAN HE SHOT DOWN
      Farida Singh had not checked her e-mail in a few days and had no idea a life-changing letter awaited her until news of it appeared in an Indian newspaper.
      CNN, August 18, 2011
    • A NEW DAWN FOR PAKISTAN'S TRIBAL AREAS
      On August 12, Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari signed the extension of the Political Party Order (2002) to the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). This is the first piece of good news for residents there since Zardari's announcement two years ago to introduce reforms to FATA's oppressive system of governance -- reforms later blocked by the military.
      Foreign Policy, August 18, 2011
    • A BAN LIFTED, KING OF FRUIT MAKES DEBUT
      A year after the U.S. lifted a ban on Pakistani mangoes, the first commercial shipment landed in New York over the weekend.Considered among their somewhat biased fans to be the world's tastiest mango, the fruits are selling for $80 to $100 for a box of six after the sole U.S. importer had to get them from Lahore to Chicago, over to Iowa for required irradiation and, finally, to New York.
      The Wall Street Journal, August 18, 2011
    • DRONES ALONE ARE NOT THE ANSWER
      American officials dealing with Pakistan now spend most of their time haggling over our military and intelligence activities, when they should instead be pursuing the sort of comprehensive social, diplomatic and economic reforms that Pakistan desperately needs and that would advance America’s long-term interests.
      The New York Times, August 18, 2011
    • RAMADAN CELEBRATED OFF MAIN ROAD IN ISLAMABAD
      Inflation rates are as high as 13% in Pakistan and wages are low.People are having difficulties making ends meet during the month of Ramadan. Local charity Human Lovers has started a new initiative giving away food to the needy by the side of the road.
      BBC News, August 18, 2011
    • FIGHTING FOR WOMEN'S RIGHTS: 21-YR-OLD WINNER ASPIRES TO BECOME A LAWYER
      Saeeda Mir, who came first at the International Book Writing Competition-USA in June, dreams of becoming a lawyer to fight for women’s rights in Gilgit-Baltistan (G-B).
      The International Herald Tribune, August 18, 2011
    • HUGE RISKS REMAIN FOR 2010 FLOOD VICTIMS IN PAKISTAN
      Slowly but surely as the immediacy and shock of the floods faded, press coverage on the victims became rarer. But the fight goes on. In a report recently published by Oxfam, it states that the “humanitarian response could have been better.”
      Newsline, August 18, 2011
    • P@SHA LAUNCHES Rs. 20 MILLION SOCIAL INNOVATION FUND
      The Pakistan Software Houses Association for IT & ITES (P@SHA) announced today that it is launching a Rs. 20,000,000 fund to drive Social Innovation in the country.
      The Pakistan Software Houses Association for IT & ITES, August 18, 2011
    • FLOODS FORCE A MILLION PAKISTANIS FROM HOMES AS MORE RAIN SEEN
      Floods have forced more than one million people from their homes and damaged crops in parts of southern Pakistan still recovering from last year’s worst ever monsoon inundations that devastated the region.
      Bloomberg, August 18, 2011
    • WHY THE US MUST THINK OUTSIDE THE MILITARY BOX
      The most frequently used clichés for Pakistan continue to invoke some degree of fundamental unknowability – sometimes this is expressed as a mystery, sometimes as unpredictability and often as anachronism. These clichés have dominated both the political and cultural frameworks of understanding Pakistan.
      The National, August 11, 2011
    • PAKISTAN BATTLES AGAINST HIDDEN HIV-AIDS MENACE
      With the number of HIV cases rising the government finally included it in its 2009 national health policy, but as the BBC's Nosheen Abbas reports, its full extent is still not widely acknowledged.
      BBC, August 10, 2011
    • PAKISTAN FLOODS: SOCIAL CENTRES FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN
      Unlike men, women and children in rural Pakistan do not have social gathering places. But the 2010 floods, the worst in the country's history, have triggered a change: NGOs have opened various women and children-only rural centres to help them in the process of rehabilitation.
      BBC, August 08, 2011
    • RAPE, MUTILATION: PAKISTAN'S TRIBAL JUSTICE FOR WOMEN
      On April 14, two men entered Asma Firdous' home, cut off six of her fingers, slashed her arms and lips and then sliced off her nose. Before leaving the house, the men locked their 28-year-old victim inside.
      Reuters, August 05, 2011
    • INQUIRY STARTS AGAINST SHADMAN SHO OVER NAIRANG ANTICS
      Another case of power abuse and police brutality surfaced the scene on Friday as Shadmaan Police Station Station House Officer (SHO) Rana Zulfiqar was held for inquiry on charges of harassing and beating staff members of the Nairang Art Gallery, including a young female curator.
      Pakistan Today, August 05, 2011
    • CHILDREN OF THE FLOODS
      In 2010, Pakistan was hit by the most severe floods in its history - at least 18 million people were affected. One year on, millions are still in dire need of assistance.
      BBC, August 01, 2011
    • DENNIS BLAIR RIPS OBAMA WHITE HOUSE
      Former Director of National Intelligence Dennis Blair unloaded on the White House Thursday evening, strongly criticizing the administration’s reliance on U.S.-directed drone strikes and saying officials have failed to implement the lessons of Sept. 11 by backing away from efforts to integrate the intelligence community.
      Politico.com, July 29, 2011
    • CELEBRATING THE LIFE OF A GAY PAKISTANI AMERICAN MUSLIM ACTIVIST
      The world lost a true trailblazer last Friday when Ifti Nasim, poet, journalist and advocate, died of a heart attack in Chicago at age 64.
      An openly gay man, Nasim left Pakistan for the United States at the age of 21 to avoid persecution and an arranged marriage, eventually settling in Chicago.
      glaad blog, July 29, 2011
    • SILENCE IS NOT AN OPTION
      Pakistan's largest sugar producer, Tareen, 59, entered politics in 2002. Now, as a member of the National Assembly from PMLF, Tareen is grouping together electables with clean records ahead of the 2013 polls hoping to sweep in change.
      Newsweek, July 29, 2011
    • COUNTERING RADICAL IDEOLOGY
      The process of radicalisation in Pakistan took hold over three decades. Abuse of religion for political ends sowed the seeds of hatred that continue to bear fruit after decades.
      The Times, Pakistan, July 28, 2011
    • THE U.S. CHARGES TWO WITH ILLEGAL LOBBYING FOR PAKISTAN
      U.S. authorities charged two Pakistani-American men with being unregistered lobbyists on the payroll of Pakistan's spy agency, a move that could add a new issue to the deteriorating relationship between the two allies.
      The Wall Street Journal, July 27, 2011
    • THIS IS PAKISTAN'S STORY: A DIALOGUE ON VIOLENCE
      Violence and terrorism have taken over Pakistani society -- every member of society has been affected in some way or another. After years of struggling with handling issues close to our hearts, we have finally seemed to come together in solidarity.
      Huffington Post, July 27, 2011
    • THE OMNIPOTENCE OF AL QAEDA AND THE MEANINGLESSNESS OF 'TERRORISM'
      Al Qaeda is always to blame, even when it isn't, even when it's allegedly the work of a Nordic, Muslim-hating, right-wing European nationalist.
      Salon.com, July 26, 2011
    • THE COURAGE TO REDEFINE PAKISTAN
      Growing up as a member of the privileged class of Karachi, I was blinded to many of the realities of my city. My friends and I were what the average Pakistani would call "burgers," an affectionately derogatory term to describe the Westernized brats of the wealthy.
      The Huffington Post, July 26, 2011
    • SALAAM KURRACHEE
      Karachi stands between bookends of Time. The Raj gave way to Partition, Scinde traveled into Sindh and Kurrachee became Karachi. However, the one constant is where it stands — the metropolis’ town centre: an epicenter of hope, survival and relentless energy.
      Dawn, July 24, 2011
    • FRENCH KNIGHTHOOD FOR PAKISTANI WOMAN
      A Pakistani woman civil servant has been awarded the prestigious French knighthood for distinguished and extraordinary services.
      The International Herald Tribune, July 20, 2011
    • PAKISTAN'S FIRST FEMALE FOREIGN MINISTER
      Hina Rabbani Khar only turned 34 this week. But despite her youth - and particularly her gender - she has been catapulted to one of the top jobs in a deeply conservative Pakistan where political careers have often ended in a hail of bullets.
      The Telegraph, London, July 20, 2011
    • THROWING PAKISTAN INTO THE ARMS OF CHINA
      The Obama administration just suspended the delivery of some 800 million dollars’ worth of aid to the Pakistani military. Such get-tough moves ignore that the United States and its allies are much more dependent on Pakistan than Pakistan is on them.
      The National Interest, July 19, 2011
    • HUMAN RIGHTS IN ISLAM
      In his book, Quran aur Insani Huquq (‘The Quran and Human Rights’), Muhammad Akhtar Muslim writes that in the western narration of history, the concept of basic human rights is traced to 500BC Greece, then to the falling in 500CE of the Roman Empire, and suddenly to 1100CE, thus ignoring the intervening 600 years comprising the rise of Islam.
      Dawn, July 15, 2011
    • JAPAN TO PROVIDE $3.48 MILLION TO PAKISTAN FOR FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM
      Japan will grant assistance of about US $3.48 million for a project for strengthening flood warning and management capacity of Pakistan.
      The International Herald Tribune, July 15, 2011
    • IMRAN KHAN SPEECH: NEVER GIVE UP YOUR DREAMS
      Imran Khan, talks about Never giving up on your Dreams at the TEDxKarachi 2011 on 27th May 2011.
      TEDxKarachi, July 08, 2011
    • JAQUELINE'S JOURNAL
      Jaqueline Novogratz published her first-hand account of daily life on the ground in Paksitan from the perspective of a humanist and a philanthropist.  Her account is refreshingly comprehensive and honest.
      The Acumen Fund, June 19, 2011
    • WHAT'S GOING RIGHT IN PAKISTAN
      There is much – way too much – that is going terribly wrong in Pakistan. But not all is lost. Not just yet.
      Pakistaniat.com, June 10, 2011
    • LEFT WITH NOTHING: THE STATE OF PAKISTAN'S MINORITIES
      A culture of anti-tolerance will continue to live on until a political party finds the backbone to introduce and implement proper reforms. It is only then that the eclipse will finally be over.
      Foreign Policy, June 10, 2011
    • OSAMA BIN LADEN DEATH: NO MOURNING OR CELEBRATION IN PAKISTAN
      Pakistan's reaction to the death of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden muted by concerns over jobs and security.

      The Guardian (London), May 04, 2011
    • PAKISTAN TRANSGENDERS PIN HOPES ON NEW RIGHTS
      The BBC's Aleem Maqbool meets transgendered people in Karachi buoyed by the ruling, but sceptical about whether it can really end the isolation they face.

      BBC, April 25, 2011
    • SOCIAL WORKER OR SPIRITUAL SAGE?
      The day I met Abdul Sattar Edhi, a living saint who gave up everything to devote his life to helping Pakistan's poorest.
      The Telegraph (London), April 11, 2011
    • EDUCATION, EDUCATION, EDUCATION
      This is a word that for decades, since soon after the country’s birth, has not figured in the lexicon of any of our ‘great’ leaders.
      Dawn, April 03, 2011
    • A GREAT DEAL OF RUIN IN A NATION
      Why Islam took a violent and intolerant turn in Pakistan, and where it might lead.
      The Economist, March 31, 2011
    • PAKISTAN'S RICHEST MAN SPEAKS
      An interview with Mian Muhammad Mansha
      Fortune, March 11, 2011
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